Immigration Newsletter

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

USCIS Automatic Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Extension | USCIS

Automatic Employment Authorization Document (EAD) Extension | USCIS: Starting Jan. 17, 2017, USCIS is automatically extending certain expiring EADs for up to 180 days for applicants who:Properly filed for a renewal EAD before their current  EAD expired, and Are otherwise eligible for a renewal, which means that:

    • Your EAD renewal is under a category that is eligible for an automatic 180-day extension (see the list of categories below); and
    • The Category on your current EAD matches the “Class Requested” listed on this Notice of Action.  (Note:  If you are a TPS beneficiary or pending applicant, your EAD and this Notice must contain either the A12 or C19 category, but the categories do not need to match each other).
We are doing so to help prevent gaps in employment authorization and documentation. This extension applies to Form I-765 renewal applications that are still pending on January 17, 2017, and to Form I-765 renewal applications filed on or after Jan. 17, 2017.

The following categories of EADs will be eligible for an automatic extension of up to 180 days:
The eligibility category you listed on your Form I-765 renewal application 
Description
(a)(3) 
Refugee
(a)(5) 
Asylee
(a)(7) 
N-8 or N-9
(a)(8) 
Citizen of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, or Palau
(a)(10) 
Withholding of Deportation or Removal Granted
(a)(12) 
Temporary Protected Status (TPS) Granted
(c)(8) 
Asylum Application Pending
(c)(9) 
Pending Adjustment of Status under Section 245 of the Act
(c)(10) 
Suspension of Deportation Applicants (filed before April 1, 1997)
Cancellation of Removal Applicants
Special Rule Cancellation of Removal Applicants Under NACARA
(c)(16) 
Creation of Record (Adjustment Based on Continuous Residence Since January 1, 1972)
(c)(19) 
Pending  initial application for TPS where USCIS determines applicant  is  prima facie eligible for TPS and can receive an EAD as a “temporary treatment benefit”. 
(c)(20) 
Section 210 Legalization (pending I-700)
(c)(22) 
Section 245A Legalization (pending I-687)
(c)(24) 
LIFE Legalization
(c)(31)
VAWA Self-Petitioners

NOTE:  TPS individuals may receive an automatic extension of their employment authorization:
  1. Through publication of a Federal Register notice extending the TPS designation of the individual’s country, provided that the Federal Register notice also authorizes an automatic extension of covered individuals’ existing EADs; and/or
  2. Through this 180-day automatic extension. 
Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Saturday, February 25, 2017

These Are Children, Not Bad Hombres - The New York Times

These Are Children, Not Bad Hombres - The New York Times



...But President Trump has decided to get tough on many of the 60,000 Central American children who arrive at our border each year begging for safety after fleeing some of the most dangerous places on earth. His executive orders, and memos from the Department of Homeland Security on how to interpret them, could strip this special treatment from the roughly 60 percent of unaccompanied children who have a parent already living in the United States. If Kendra and Roberto were just entering the United States now, they would fall into this group; instead they kept their protections and were eventually united with their mother, a house painter in Los Angeles.

Parents like her, the argument goes, are exploiting benefits established to help children who really are alone here. The administration has threatened to deport parents who send for their children or prosecute them for hiring smugglers.
Last week Mr. Trump’s press secretary said the president’s intention was to prioritize the deportation of immigrants who “represent a threat to public safety.” Supporters say he’s upholding the law. But these children are not threats, and there are many ways to preserve the integrity of our immigration laws while treating them humanely.
D.H.S. hasn’t fully explained how it will deal with children reclassified as “accompanied” if a parent steps forward to claim them. “There is a range of how bad this might be,” says Michelle Brané, director of the Migrant Rights and Justice Program at the Women’s Refugee Commission.
But it could be pretty bad. In recent years, up to 90 percent of unaccompanied Central American kids have willingly turned themselves over to Border Patrol agents, knowing they would be cared for. Now they will go to great lengths to avoid detection, walking through deserts for days, risking dehydration, or traveling stuffed into hidden compartments in cars or trucks, where they can suffocate.
Smuggling fees will escalate. When that happens, smugglers often collect half in the home country and require children to work off the other half as indentured servants. Experts expect to see more cases like the one in 2014, when federal agents rescued eight Guatemalan teenagers from a trailer park in Ohio, where they’d been held captive by smugglers and forced to work at an egg farm.
Children will be afraid to admit they have parents here, as they were in the late 1990s and early 2000s, when the government often told parents to retrieve apprehended children, only to deport the whole family when they showed up. 


To read the full story click on the link to NYT





 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Mexico or America? A Couple, One of Them Undocumented, Weigh the Risks of Where to Live - The New York Times

Mexico or America? A Couple, One of Them Undocumented, Weigh the Risks of Where to Live - The New York Times












ontinue reading the main storyShare This Page

It just goes to show why comprehensive immigration reform should have been done a long time ago. Our government seems incapable of solving this dilemma.





Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Friday, November 18, 2016

Donald Trump’s Plan to Purge the Nation - The New York Times

Donald Trump’s Plan to Purge the Nation - The New York Times

President-elect Donald Trump says he will move immediately to deport or imprison two million, maybe three million, unauthorized-immigrant criminals. “What we are going to do is get the people that are criminal and have criminal records, gang members, drug dealers,” he said on Sunday on “60 Minutes.”

Like many of his proposals, this one sounds tough and straightforward, but makes no sense under scrutiny and is frightening to think about.

Start with the fact that the target number is made up. There simply aren’t as many criminal immigrants as he imagines. According to rough estimates by the Migration Policy Institute, of the country’s 11 million unauthorized immigrants, about 820,000 have criminal records. About 300,000 of those have felony convictions and are presumably the bad people Mr. Trump is talking about. If he deports those and only those, it will be a remarkable display of law-enforcement discretion, since he said that there were lots of “terrific people” among the unauthorized who might be allowed to stay, “after the border is secured and after everything gets normalized.”

click the link to read the rest of the Editorial at NYT

Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

In-Country Refugee/Parole Processing for Minors in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala (Central American Minors – CAM) | USCIS

In-Country Refugee/Parole Processing for Minors in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala (Central American Minors – CAM) | USCIS: EspañolUpdate: On July 26, 2016, Department of State (DOS) and DHS announced that the CAM program would expand to include additional eligible family members. Starting November 15, 2016, DOS will acce

Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Adam Ruins Everything on US Immigration Courts



Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Syria Redesignated for Temporary Protected Status (TPS)


Release Date: 
WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has redesignated Syria for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and extended the existing TPS designation for the country from Oct. 1, 2016, through March 31, 2018. This allows eligible nationals of Syria (or persons without nationality who last habitually resided in Syria) to register or re-register for TPS in accordance with the Federal Register notice published today.
Who is Eligible
Current TPS Status
When to File
Current TPS beneficiaries from Syria
Have TPS
To extend your TPS, you must re-register during the 60-day re-registration period that runs from Aug. 1, 2016, through Sept. 30, 2016.
Syrian nationals and persons without nationality who last habitually resided in Syria, who have:
  • Continuously resided in the United States since Aug. 1, 2016, and
  • Been continuously physically present in the United States since Oct. 1, 2016.
Do not have TPS
To obtain TPS, you may apply for TPS during the 180-day initial registration period that runs from Aug. 1, 2016, through Jan. 30, 2017.

Individuals re-registering for TPS:

Current beneficiaries under Syria’s TPS designation seeking to extend their TPS status must re-register during a 60-day period that runs from Aug. 1, 2016, through Sept. 30, 2016. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to re-register as soon as possible.
The 18-month extension also allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Eligible Syria TPS beneficiaries who re-register during the 60-day period and request a new EAD will receive one with an expiration date of March 31, 2018. USCIS recognizes that some re-registrants may not receive their new EADs until after their current work permits expire. Therefore, USCIS is automatically extending current TPS Syria EADs with a Sept. 30, 2016, expiration date for an additional six months. These existing EADs are now valid through March 31, 2017.
To re-register, current TPS beneficiaries must submit:

Individuals applying for TPS for the first time:

For Syrian nationals (and persons having no nationality who last habitually resided in Syria) who do not currently have TPS, the TPS redesignation may allow them to apply for TPS if they have continuously resided in the United States since Aug. 1, 2016, and have been continuously physically present in the United States since Oct. 1, 2016. Applicants must meet all other TPS eligibility and filing requirements.
To apply for the first time, individuals must submit:
Individuals who still have a pending initial TPS application under Syria’s designation do not need to submit a new Form I-821. However, if they currently have a TPS-related EAD and want a new EAD, they should submit:
Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com