Immigration Newsletter

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Here is what the nearest USCIS Asylum office says it is working on:

Newark, NJ

                     Interviews are being scheduled for:         If your application was filed in:

                              November 2015        ------------------          June 2013
                              October 2015            ------------------          May ­ June 2013
                              September 2015        ------------------          May ­ June 2013






Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

In-Country Refugee/Parole Program for Minors in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras With Parents Lawfully Present in the United States

In-Country Refugee/Parole Program for Minors in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras With Parents Lawfully Present in the United States

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE and U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
The United States is establishing an in-country refugee/parole program in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras to provide a safe, legal, and orderly alternative to the dangerous journey that some children are currently undertaking to the United States. This program will allow certain parents who are lawfully present in the United States to request access to the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for their children still in one of these three countries. Children who are found ineligible for refugee admission but still at risk of harm may be considered for parole on a case-by-case basis. The refugee/parole program will not be a pathway for undocumented parents to bring their children to the United States, but instead, the program will provide certain vulnerable, at-risk children an opportunity to be reunited with parents lawfully resident in the United States.
Applications for this program are initiated in the United States. Beginning in December 2014, a parent lawfully present in the United States will be able to file Department of State form DS-7699 requesting a refugee resettlement interview for unmarried children under 21 in El Salvador, Guatemala, or Honduras. Under certain circumstances, if the second parent resides with the child in the home country and is currently married to the lawfully present parent in the United States, the second parent may be added to the child’s petition and considered for refugee status, and if denied refugee status, for parole. Form DS-7699 must be filed with the assistance of a designated resettlement agency that works with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration to help resettle refugees in the United States. The form will not be available on the Department of State website to the general public and cannot be completed without the assistance of a Department of State-funded resettlement agency. These resettlement agencies are located in more than 180 communities throughout the United States. When the program is launched, the Department of State will provide information on how to contact one of these agencies to initiate an application.
Once a form DS-7699 has been filed, the child in his/her home country will be assisted through the program by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), which manages the U.S. Resettlement Support Center (RSC) in Latin America. IOM personnel from the RSC will contact each child directly and in the order in which the forms filed by lawfully present parents have been received by the U.S. Department of State. IOM will invite the children to attend pre-screening interviews in their country of origin in order to prepare them for a refugee interview with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DNA relationship testing will be required to confirm the biological relationship between the parent in the United States and the in-country child. After the IOM pre-screening interview but before the DHS interview, the lawfully present parent in the United States will be notified by IOM via the resettlement agency about how to submit DNA evidence of the relationship with their claimed child(ren) in El Salvador, Guatemala, or Honduras. If DNA relationship testing confirms the claimed relationship(s), IOM will schedule the DHS refugee interview.
DHS will conduct interviews with each child to determine whether he or she is eligible for refugee status and admissible to the United States. All applicants must complete all required security checks and obtain a medical clearance before they are approved to travel as a refugee to the United States. IOM will arrange travel for the refugee(s) to the United States. The parent of the child will sign a promissory note agreeing to repay the cost of travel to the United States. Approved refugees will be eligible for the same support provided to all refugees resettled in the United States, including assignment to a resettlement agency that will assist with reception and placement, and assistance registering children in school.
Applicants found by DHS to be ineligible for refugee status in the United States will be considered on a case-by-case basis for parole, which is a mechanism to allow someone who is otherwise inadmissible to come to the United States for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit. An individual considered for parole may be eligible for parole if DHS finds that the individual is at risk of harm, he/she clears all background vetting, there is no serious derogatory information, and someone has committed to financially support the individual while he/she is in the United States. Those children and any eligible parent considered for parole will be responsible for obtaining and paying for a medical clearance. An individual authorized parole will not be eligible for a travel loan but must book and pay for the flight to the United States. Parole is temporary and does not confer any permanent legal immigration status or path to permanent legal immigration status in the United States. Parolees are not eligible for medical and other benefits upon arrival in the United States, but are eligible to attend school and/or apply for employment authorization. Individuals authorized parole under this program generally will be authorized parole for an initial period of two years and may request renewal.
It is anticipated that a relatively small number of children from Central America will be admitted to the United States as refugees in FY 2015, given the anticipated December launch and the length of time it takes to be processed for U.S. refugee admission. Any child or parent admitted as a refugee will be included in the Latin America/Caribbean regional allocation of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program, which is 4,000 for FY 2015. If needed, there is some flexibility within the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program to accommodate a higher than anticipated number from Latin America in FY 2015.

Designated Resettlement Agency in NH


Ascentria Community Services, Inc.
Address: 261 Sheep Davis Road, Suite A-1
Concord, NH 03301
Phone: 603-224-8111 Fax: 603-224-5473 


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Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Monday, November 16, 2015


http://www.npr.org/2015/11/13/455790454/as-asylum-seekers-swap-prison-beds-for-ankle-bracelets-same-firm-profits

This story is worth reading. It's not just the government inflicting unnecessary pain on individuals and families so that private corporations can profit. It appears to be a revolving door case as well, where a former high ranking government official is offered a (no doubt well compensated) position at a private firm due to their ability to land lucrative government contracts.

This is so wrong on so many levels.


Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Friday, August 28, 2015

New Internet Ad about Presidential Candidates' Immigration views




Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Thursday, June 25, 2015

DHS Grants Temporary Protected Status for Nepal





TPS for Nepal

Through this Notice, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announces that the Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary) has designated Nepal for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for a period of 18 months, effective June 24, 2015 through December 24, 2016. Under section 244(b)(1)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1254a(b)(1)(B), the Secretary is authorized to designate a foreign state (or any part thereof) for TPS upon finding that the foreign state has experienced an earthquake resulting in a substantial, but temporary, disruption of living conditions.
This designation allows eligible Nepalese nationals (and aliens having no nationality who last habitually resided in Nepal) who have continuously resided in the United States since June 24, 2015, and have been continuously physically present in the United States since June 24, 2015 to be granted TPS. This Notice also describes the other eligibility criteria applicants must meet.
Individuals who believe they may qualify for TPS under this designation may apply within the 180-day registration period that begins on June 24, 2015 and ends on December 21, 2015. They may also apply for Employment Authorization Documents (EAD) and for travel authorization. Through this Notice, DHS also sets forth the procedures for nationals of Nepal (or aliens having no nationality who last habitually resided in Nepal) to apply for TPS, EADs, and travel authorization with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Tips on Paying Your Immigrant Fee | USCIS

Tips on Paying Your Immigrant Fee | USCIS

Tips on Paying Your Immigrant Fee

Paying the Fee

If you are immigrating to the United States and will be admitted as a lawful permanent resident, you must pay a $165 USCIS Immigrant Fee. You must pay this fee online using the USCIS Electronic Immigration System (USCIS ELIS).
We strongly encourage you to pay this fee after you receive your immigrant visa packet from the U.S. embassy or consulate abroad (including Canada and Mexico) and before you depart for the United States. Paying before you depart for the United States will ensure that you receive your Permanent Resident Card (commonly referred to as a Green Card) without delay. However, you can also pay the USCIS Immigrant Fee after you immigrate to the United States. We will send your Green Card to you after you pay the fee.
To pay the $165 fee in USCIS ELIS, you will need an online account. Once you have created your account, you can pay the fee by logging in to USCIS ELIS and selectingUSCIS Immigrant Fee from the drop-down menu. You will need your Alien Number (A-Number) and Department of State (DOS) Case ID to pay the fee.
You may pay for yourself and any family members who will live with you in the United States. Attorneys, accredited representatives and employers are not authorized to create a USCIS ELIS account on your behalf to pay the USCIS Immigrant Fee. Only you, as the immigrant, may open a USCIS ELIS account and pay the required fee to obtain your Green Card.
You will receive an ADIT (Alien Documentation, Identification and Telecommunications) stamp (also known as a visa stamp) upon entering the United States. This stamp will serve as proof of your lawful permanent resident status for up to 1 year or until you receive your Green Card.
To pay the USCIS Immigrant Fee through USCIS ELIS, you must provide the following:
  • Your A-Number and DOS Case ID (please visit Tips on Finding Your A-Number and DOS Case ID for more information);
  • The A-Numbers, DOS Case IDs and correct biographical information for each family member for whom you are paying the USCIS Immigrant Fee; and
  • Valid payment information. You must pay either with a valid credit or debit card or provide your bank routing and checking account numbers to have money taken directly from your U.S. bank account.
Please keep a copy of your receipt for your records. (To have an electronic confirmation sent to you, please provide your email address in the spaces provided when making your payment.)
 

Finding Your A-Number and DOS Case ID

Visit Tips on Finding Your A-Number and DOS Case ID  for instructions on where to find this information.
 

Unpaid Fees

USCIS will not issue you a Green Card until we receive your Immigrant Fee payment. If you fail to pay your fee within 45 days, USCIS will send you a notice requesting payment. If you do not pay the fee within the time specified in the notice, you will not receive your Green Card..
==============================================================================
I think this has to be one of the dumbest inventions yet by USCIS. Making the immigrant go online and pay a fee by credit card. Explicitly stating that the attorney or accredited representative cannot do it for them. Many immigrants are very technically savvy and many have means and credit. But what about older parents of US citizens who may not understand computers, what about people who don't have computers or credit cards? What about the fact that the USCIS ELIS website is written in English?



This is too diabolically bad to even be a mistake -- shame on you USCIS for setting this up this way.



 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Monday, April 27, 2015

Think of Undocumented Immigrants as Parents, Not Problems - NYTimes.com

Think of Undocumented Immigrants as Parents, Not Problems - NYTimes.com



LOS ANGELES — SOMETHING happened while the immigration system in the United States got broken, something that should change the way we talk about fixing it. Years went by, and nature took its course. More than 11 million unauthorized immigrants settled into our communities; many formed families and had children. Now at least one of every 15 children living in the United States has an unauthorized parent, and nearly all of those children are native-born United States citizens.
Think of that statistic, one in 15, the next time you drive by a school or a playground. Think of those children living with the knowledge that the federal government can take their parents away. Common sense tells you that the threat of a parent’s deportation will exact a terrible price.
Now it’s possible to get some measure of how big the cost is. In a recent report, we assessed more than 50 research studies of the children of unauthorized immigrants conducted by scholars in a variety of fields. This growing body of work shows that fear and uncertainty breed difficulties that manifest themselves in delayed cognitive developmentlower educational performance and clinical levels of anxiety.

-----------

click the link above to see the rest of this opinion piece in the NYTimes online



Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Thursday, April 9, 2015

DACA Renewals should be filed 150 days before expiration. - Drew Law Office, pllc.

DACA Renewals should be filed 150 days before expiration. - Drew Law Office, pllc.



While we are waiting for expanded DACA and DAPA to be released from the Injunction ordered by a Federal Judge in Texas -- it is important to note that persons already granted deferred action under the initial DACA program need to start the renewal process well in advance of their employment authorization expiration date. See below

From: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services [mailto:uscis@public.govdelivery.com]
Sent: Tuesday, April 07, 2015 6:39 PM
To:
Subject: USCIS Message: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Renewal
Dear Stakeholder,
Please help us spread this message in immigrant communities:
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) reminds recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood
Arrivals (DACA) that their current period of DACA and employment authorization could expire if they wait
too long to request renewal.
We strongly encourage you to submit your renewal request 150 to 120 days before your current period of
DACA and employment authorization will expire. Timely filing will help ensure USCIS has sufficient time
to consider your request.




 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Monday, April 6, 2015

Employment Authorization | USCIS

Employment Authorization | USCIS I found the handy list on USCIS.gov



8 CFR 274a.12 
Description
(a)(1) Employment authorized incident to status
(a)(2) Lawful Temporary Resident
(a)(3) Refugee
(a)(4) Paroled Refugee
(a)(5) Asylee
(a)(6) FiancĂ©(e)
(K-1 or K-2 Nonimmigrant)
(a)(7) N-8 or N-9
(a)(8) Citizen of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, or Palau
(a)(9) K-3 or K-4
(a)(10) Withholding of Removal
(a)(11) Deferred Enforced Departure (Extended Voluntary Departure)
(a)(12) Temporary Protected Status
(a)(13) Family Unity Program
(Section 301 of the Immigration Act of 1990)
(a)(14) 
LIFE Legalization
(Section 1504 of the Legal Immigrant Family Equity (LIFE) Act Amendments)
(a)(15) 
V Visa Nonimmigrants
(a)(16) T-1 Visa Nonimmigrant
(a)(17) E Visa Nonimmigrant Spouses
(a)(18) L Visa Nonimmigrant Spouses
(a)(19) U-1 Nonimmigrants
(a)(20) U-2, U-3, U-4, or U-5 Nonimmigrants
(c)(1) Spouse/Dependent of A-1 or A-2 Visa Nonimmigrant
(c)(2) Spouse/Dependent of Coordination Council for North American Affairs (E-1)/ Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO)
(c)(3)(A) F-1 Student, Pre-Completion Optional Practical Training
(c)(3)(B) F-1 Student, Post-Completion Optional Practical Training
(c)(3)(C) F-1 Student, 17-month extension for STEM Students
(c)(3)(ii)F-1 Student, Off-Campus Employment Sponsored by a Qualifying International Organization

(c)(3)(iii) 
F-1 Student, Off-Campus Employment Due to Severe Economic Hardship

(c)(4) 
Spouse/Dependent of G-1, G-3, or G-4
(c)(5) J-2 Spouse or Child of J-1 Exchange Visitor

(c)(6) 
M-1 Student, Practical Training
(c)(7) Dependent of NATO-1 through NATO-6
(c)(8) Asylum Application Pending filed on/after January 4, 1995
(c)(8) Asylum Application Pending filed before January 4, 1995 and applicant is not in exclusion/deportation proceedings
(c)(8) Asylum Application Pending filed before January 4, 1995 and applicant is in exclusion/deportation proceedings
(c)(8) Asylum Application under ABC Agreement
(c)(9) Pending Adjustment of Status under Section 245 of the Act
(c)(10) Suspension of Deportation Applicants (filed before April 1, 1997)
Cancellation of Removal Applicants
Cancellation Applicants Under NACARA
(c)(11) Public Interest Parolee
(c)(14) Deferred Action (not based on an approved I-360 petition filed for a battered/abused spouse or child)
(c)(14) Deferred Action (based on an approved I-360 petition filed for a battered/abused spouse or child)
(c)(15) Not in use
(c)(16) Creation of Record (Adjustment Based on Continuous Residence Since January 1, 1972)
(c)(17)(i) B-1 Domestic of a Nonimmigrant

(c)(17)(ii) 
B-1 Domestic of a USC
(c)(17)(iii) Employee of a Foreign Airline
(c)(18) Order of Supervision
(c)(19) Temporary Treatment Benefits
(c)(20) Section 210 Legalization
(c)(21) S Visa Nonimmigrant
(c)(22) Section 245A Legalization (pending I-687)
(c)(23) Irish Peace Process (Q-2)
(c)(24) LIFE Legalization

Last Reviewed/Updated: 01/27/2015





 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Thursday, February 19, 2015


http://www.immigrationblog.us/2015/02/obama-pospone-acciones-sobre.html
WASHINGTON — One day before hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants were to begin applying for work permits and legal protection, administration officials on Tuesday postponed President Obama’s sweeping executive actions on immigration indefinitely, saying they had no choice but to comply with a federal judge’s last-minute order halting the programs.
The judge’s ruling was a significant setback for the president, who had asserted broad authority to take executive actions in the face of congressional Republicans’ refusal to overhaul the immigration system. White House officials have defended the president’s actions as legal and proper even as his adversaries in Congress and the states have accused him of vastly exceeding the powers of his office.
In a decision late Monday, Judge Andrew S. Hanen, of Federal District Court for the Southern District of Texas, in Brownsville, ruled in favor of Texas and 25 other states that had challenged Mr. Obama’s immigration actions. The judge said that the administration’s programs would impose major burdens on states, unleashing illegal immigration and straining state budgets, and that the administration had not followed required procedures for changing federal rules.
Mr. Obama vowed Tuesday to appeal the court ruling and expressed confidence that he would prevail in the legal battle to defend his signature domestic policy achievement. “The law is on our side, and history is on our side,” he declared.
White House officials said the government would continue preparing to put Mr. Obama’s executive actions into effect but would not begin accepting applications from undocumented workers until the legal case was settled. That could take months. In the meantime, the president urged Republican lawmakers to return to negotiations on a broader overhaul of immigration laws.
“We should not be tearing some mom away from her child when the child has been born here and that mom has been living here the last 10 years minding her own business and being an important part of the community,” he said.
White House officials said the Justice Department was reviewing whether to ask an appeals court to block Judge Hanen’s ruling and allow the executive actions to proceed. But for now, the judge’s ruling could be a crushing disappointment to members of the immigrant community, who have spent much of the last two years pressuring Mr. Obama to act decisively to prevent deportations that separate immigrant families, including many with children or spouses who are living in the United States legally.
click the link above to see the rest of the story
Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

In-Country Refugee/Parole Processing for Minors in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala (Central American Minors – CAM) | USCIS

In-Country Refugee/Parole Processing for Minors in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala (Central American Minors – CAM) | USCIS



ntroduction
The Central American Minors (CAM) Refugee/Parole Program provides certain qualified minors in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras a safe, legal, and orderly alternative to the dangerous journey that some children are currently undertaking to the United States.
The CAM program began accepting applications from qualifying parents in the U.S. for their children on December 1, 2014. The qualifying parent is the U.S.-based parent who may complete the application. Only certain parents, described below, are eligible to be qualifying parents and file for their children. Each qualified child must be unmarried, under the age of 21, and residing in El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras. In certain cases, the parent of the qualifying child  may also qualify for access if the parent is the spouse of the qualifying parent. See below for eligibility details.
Eligibility
Qualifying Child
The qualifying child in El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras must be:
  • The child of the qualifying parent per the Immigration and Nationality Act (biological, step, or legally adopted);
  • Unmarried;
  • Under the age of 21;
  • A national of El Salvador, Guatemala, or Honduras; and
  • Residing in his or her country of nationality.
Eligible Family Members
In some cases, other eligible family members may have access, including:
  • Unmarried children of the qualifying child who are under the age of 21 can be included as derivatives.
Parent of Qualifying Child Who is not the Qualifying Parent
This program is primarily aimed at minors, but a parent of the qualifying child may be included if:
  • He/she is part of the same household and economic unit as the qualifying child,
  • He/she is legally married to the qualifying parent at the time the qualifying parent files the CAM-Affidavit of Relationship (AOR), and
  • He/she continues to be legally married to the qualifying parent.
Qualifying Parent
The qualifying parent may be any individual who is at least 18 years old and lawfully present in the United States in one of the following categories:
  • Permanent Resident Status, or
  • Temporary Protected Status, or
  • Parolee, or
  • Deferred Action
  • Deferred Enforced Departure, or
  • Withholding of Removal
Deferred Action
Parolees and persons granted deferred action must have been issued parole or deferred action for a minimum of one year. For all other categories listed above, individuals who are lawfully present and in a valid status at the time of application (this means the date of CAM-Affidavit of Relationship filing) are eligible.
Application Process
There is no filing deadline for this program, but the qualifying parent must be in one of the current statuses listed above at the time of applying for this program, as well as at the time of admission or parole of the beneficiary of this program.
The qualifying parent in the U.S. files Form DS-7699 Affidavit of Relationship (AOR) for Minors Who Are Nationals of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras (CAM-AOR). This form can only be accessed and completed with the assistance of a designated resettlement agency (RA). For additional information and a listing of resettlement agencies where the CAM-AOR may be filed please visit the Department of State, Refugee Processing Center’s website.
There is no fee to participate in this refugee/parole program and it is prohibited for anyone to charge a fee for completion of the form.
DNA Testing
DNA relationship testing must occur between the qualifying parent in the U.S. and his/her biological children. The parent in the U.S. will pay the initial costs of DNA testing and will be reimbursed for testing costs ONLY if ALL claimed and tested biological relationships are confirmed by DNA test results.
Refugee Status
Refugee status is a form of protection available to those who meet the definition of refugee and who are of special humanitarian concern to the United States. For a legal definition of refugee, see section 101(a)(42) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).
Both the qualifying child and the in-country parent of the qualifying child must  establish an independent refugee claim to be granted refugee status.
Eligibility for refugee status is determined on a case-by-case basis through an interview with a specially-trained USCIS officer.
Applicants who gain  access to the program, but are found ineligible for refugee status will be considered on a case-by-case basis for parole into the United States.
For more information about refugees, see the “Refugees” section of our website.
Parole
Parole allows individuals who may be otherwise inadmissible to come to the U.S. on a case-by-case basis for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit.  A separate application for this process is not required.
An applicant found conditionally eligible for parole is subject to the following additional requirements:
  • Medical Clearance and Costs: All applicants for parole will be required to obtain and pay for medical clearance.
  • Travel Arrangements and Costs: An individual who is authorized parole must book his or her travel through an approved USCIS process and pay for the flight to the United States.
USCIS will be updating the CAM webpage to provide updated information on Parole as part of the CAM Program. Please check back periodically to view this updated information.
 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

DACA Expansion opens February 18, 2015



 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program
Who
  • Individuals with no lawful immigration status who are seeking initial or renewal DACA.
What
  • Extends the deferred action period and employment authorization to three years from two years, and allows you to be considered for DACA if you:
    • Entered the United States before the age of 16;
    • Have lived in the United States continuously since at least January 1, 2010, rather than the prior requirement of June 15, 2007;
    • Are of any age (removes the requirement to have been born since June 15, 1981); and
    • Meet all the other DACA guidelines.
When
  • February 18, 2015 (USCIS will not accept requests for expanded DACA before that date.)
How
Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Friday, January 16, 2015

Immigrants Can Get Mexican Birth Certificates in U.S. - NBC News.com

Immigrants Can Get Mexican Birth Certificates in U.S. - NBC News.com





Starting Thursday, Mexico's 50 consulates in the U.S. will be able to issue birth certificates to Mexican citizens. The move will make it easier for Mexican immigrants to obtain driver's licenses, passports, work permits and protection from deportation under President Obama's upcoming executive action.
"It helps individuals really begin to formulate their formal identity in this country," said Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles. Prior to this change some immigrants in the U.S. relied on relatives in Mexico to get their birth certificates, which was a longer and more difficult process.
About half of the approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S. are from Mexico, and experts believe about 3 million could be eligible for executive action under Obama's plan.
Mexican consulates will be able to access data from regional governments. Some rural villages where documents are not digitally recorded may not be covered, but consulates should be able to issue birth certificates for nearly all birthplaces.
Jessica Vaughan, policy director at the Center for Immigration Studies which advocates for tighter limits on immigration, said it is important that the U.S. communicate with Mexico to ensure the system is established effectively and with integrity.








 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Recent Announcements - Drew Law Office, pllc.

Syria TPS Redesignation/ Extension Recent Announcements - Drew Law Office, pllc.



WASHINGTON - Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has redesignated Syria for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and extended the existing TPS designation for the country from April 1, 2015, through Sept. 30, 2016. This allows eligible nationals of Syria (or persons without nationality who last habitually resided in Syria) to register or re-register for TPS in accordance with thenotice published today in the Federal Register.
Who is EligibleCurrent TPS StatusWhere to File
Current TPS beneficiaries from SyriaHave TPSTo extend your TPS, you must re-register during a 60-day re-registration period that runs from Jan. 5, 2015, through March 6, 2015.
Syrian nationals and persons without nationality who last habitually resided in Syria, who have:
  • Continuously resided in the United States since Jan. 5, 2015, and
  • Been continuously physically present in the United States since April 1, 2015.
Do not have TPSTo obtain TPS, you may apply for TPS during a 180-day initial registration period that runs from Jan. 5, 2015, through July 6, 2015.
During the past year, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State reviewed the conditions in Syria. Based upon this review, Secretary Johnson determined that a redesignation and 18-month extension of TPS for Syria is warranted due to an ongoing armed conflict and extraordinary and temporary conditions in Syria that prevent its nationals from returning in safety.
Individuals re-registering for TPS:
Current Syrian TPS beneficiaries seeking to extend their TPS status must re-register during a 60-day period that runs from Jan. 5, 2015, through March 6, 2015. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to re-register as soon as possible once the 60-day period begins. USCIS will not accept applications before Jan. 5, 2015.
The 18-month extension allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new Employment Authorization Document (EAD). Eligible Syria TPS beneficiaries who re-register during the 60-day period and request a new EAD will receive one with an expiration date of Sept. 30, 2016. USCIS recognizes that some re-registrants may not receive their new EADs until after their current EADs expire. Therefore, USCIS is automatically extending current TPS Syria EADs with a March 31, 2015, expiration date for an additional six months. These existing EADs are now valid through Sept. 30, 2015.
To re-register, individuals must submit:
Individuals applying for TPS for the first time:
For Syrian nationals (and persons having no nationality who last habitually resided in Syria) who do not currently have TPS, the TPS redesignation may allow them to apply for TPS if they have continuously resided in the United States since Jan. 5, 2015, and have been continuously physically present in the United States since April 1, 2015. In addition, applicants must meet all other TPS eligibility and filing requirements.
To apply for the first time, individuals must submit:
Individuals who still have a pending initial TPS application under Syria do not need to submit a new Form I-821. However, if such individuals currently have a TPS-related EAD and want a new EAD, they must submit:
DHS anticipates that approximately 5,000 individuals will be eligible to re-register for TPS under the existing designation of Syria and estimates that approximately 5,000 additional individuals may be eligible for TPS under the redesignation.
Applicants may request that USCIS waive any fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. USCIS will reject the TPS application of any applicant who fails to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee-waiver request.
Additional information about TPS for Syria—including guidance on eligibility, the application process and where to file—is available online at www.uscis.gov/tps. The Federal Register notice published today contains further details about this extension and redesignation of Syria for TPS, including application requirements and procedures, and the automatic six-month extension of current TPS Syria EADs.
All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download these forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request forms by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.
Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).
For more information about USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow USCIS on Facebook (/uscis), Twitter(@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.


 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com